Thursday, 29 November 2018 12:12

Crook

Written by 

The world's biggest producer of milk, India, has a problem: at least 68% of dairy products sold there don’t meet the food standards.

Here’s more bad news: according to the World Health Organisation, if such adulteration were not checked immediately, 87% of citizens would be suffering from serious diseases, even cancer, by 2025.

So researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology, (IIT) Hyderabad, seem to have found a way to help detect adulteration using a smartphone

A detector system will measure the acidity of milk through an indicator paper that changes colour depending on the level. The researchers have also developed algorithms that can be incorporated into a mobile phone to accurately detect the colour change. On testing milk spiked with various combinations of contaminants, the team found near-perfect classification with accuracy of 99.71%.

 

More like this

NZ needs a better story

New Zealand needs to do a better job of telling its story in India, said a speaker at a New Zealand India Business Council summit.

» The RNG Weather Report

Featured

 

New farm debt mediation law

Proactive and well-prepared farmers and lenders stand to gain from the introduction of the Farm Debt Mediation scheme, according to Scott Abel and Bridie McKinnon from law firm Buddle Findlay.

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

Milking It

Nats cop it too

Interestingly, none of the politicians managed to escape the wrath of farmers at the protest march organised by the lobby…

Why the stripes?

An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have proven a radical, nature-inspired solution to a…

» Connect with Dairy News