Thursday, 29 November 2018 12:12

Crook

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The world's biggest producer of milk, India, has a problem: at least 68% of dairy products sold there don’t meet the food standards.

Here’s more bad news: according to the World Health Organisation, if such adulteration were not checked immediately, 87% of citizens would be suffering from serious diseases, even cancer, by 2025.

So researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology, (IIT) Hyderabad, seem to have found a way to help detect adulteration using a smartphone

A detector system will measure the acidity of milk through an indicator paper that changes colour depending on the level. The researchers have also developed algorithms that can be incorporated into a mobile phone to accurately detect the colour change. On testing milk spiked with various combinations of contaminants, the team found near-perfect classification with accuracy of 99.71%.

 
 

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Crook

The world's biggest producer of milk, India, has a problem: at least 68% of dairy products sold there don’t meet…

 
 

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