Monday, 11 June 2018 11:38

Rides, hauls no worries

Written by  Adam Fricker
Nissan Navara. Nissan Navara.

Recently we spent a day testing out the new rear suspension upgrades to the Nissan Navara on Australian roads. Now we've tested it in New Zealand.

At the launch, we drove it with weight in the tray and then with a decently heavy trailer. Nissan wanted the focus to be on the improved performance of the rear end under load. The general consensus was the Navara passed that test, no worries.

In any given week, the average ute does as many, if not more, miles with little or no weight on the tray or towbar than it does loaded to capacity, so unladen ride comfort and general liveability are important measures too. 

Nissan’s claim that the new dual-rate rear springs actually improve ride comfort stands up. Expectations about ride comfort in a ute have evolved with VW and Ford raising standards to new levels in recent years. The Navara doesn’t quite match those two, but the ride is still very good.

Allied with a quicker steering rack, the Nissan chassis also goes around the bends better and with less arm action. 

It will hold its line when punted through a corner and is not thrown by mid corner bumps. It’s a relaxing drive and, some diesel rattle aside, it is quiet.

Equipment levels in the ST-X version we drove have been enhanced with 360-degree bird’s eye view displayed on a 7 inch monitor and satellite navigation built in. Two ISOFix child restraint mounting points have been added to the rear seat.

The 2.3L twin turbo diesel remains unchanged – no bad thing – and the 450Nm maximum torque available from just 1500rpm, delivered via a 7-speed automatic, makes for a smooth and capable power-train. A 6-speed manual is also available.

The ST-X double cab auto, as tested, retails at $64,490. The suspension changes also apply across the double cab SL and ST grades though, and you can get into a 2WD ST for $47,290.

More like this

Fieldays reputation takes a battering

Since COVID-19 sent the country into lockdown, Fieldays has tried to re-group, but amid disquiet about its reluctance to refund deposits to cash-strapped agribusinesses, questions are being asked about its future.

Do the right thing!

The Hound is picking up a lot of negative feedback around the traps about the arrogant stance of National Fieldays organisers.

Featured

Water reforms come at a cost

The government’s new freshwater laws, signed off this week, have the potential to create significant unnecessary costs for ratepayers, farmers and entire communities, Federated Farmers says.

2020 harvest yields up

Final harvest data for wheat, barley and oats (milling/malting and feed) in 2020 show yields were up 17% overall across the six crops.

 

Difficult but the right call

DairyNZ chief executive Dr Tim Mackle says the joint decision three years ago to eradicate Mycoplamsa bovis was a difficult call.

Milking cluster milks runner-up award

DeLaval has come away with the runner up prize in this year’s Fieldays Online innovation competition with a new milking cluster that eliminates the need for conventional liner changes.

Glow worms to cows

Thomas Lundman's work focus has gone from tracking tiny critters in pitch black caves to looking after considerably larger animals in paddocks near Whakatane.

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Spell check

Your old mutt was not surprised to see the NZ Dairy Industry Awards hastily remove the title of this year’s…

About time!

Your canine crusader has been a long-time critic of NZ governments – of all stripes – who, for the past…

» Connect with Rural News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter