Thursday, 19 November 2020 12:25

Exploring benefits of pasture-raised beef and lamb

Written by  Staff Reporters
A team of researchers will look at the benefits of pasture-raised beef and lamb. A team of researchers will look at the benefits of pasture-raised beef and lamb.

New Zealanders will be invited to take part in a major research programme to assess the health and wellbeing benefits of eating pasture-raised beef and lamb, compared to alternatives.

 

Approximately 100 people will be monitored in two ground-breaking clinical studies, led by researchers from AgResearch, the Riddet Institute and the University of Auckland.

The projects will assess the physical effects on the body from eating the different foods for up to 10 weeks, as well as psychological elements, such as satisfaction, sleep and stress levels.

The research team includes meat scientists, agricultural academics, dietitians, behavioural experts and social scientists.

Sirma Karapeeva, chief executive of Meat Industry Association, is excited by the programme of research being undertaken.

She said much of the global research on the health, nutritional and environmental aspects of red meat was based on intensive grain-finished farming systems.

“However, New Zealand specialises in free-range livestock farming that is naturally pasture-raised, antibiotic-free and hormone-free,” Karapeeva said.

“We know there are myths and misinformation about the production and benefits of eating red meat, so we have turned to research to help bring balance to what consumers are hearing.

She said that consumers are making decisions around their diets based on ideologies.

“In part, this is a backlash against broken food systems, such as factory farming and ‘big food’. There is a growing consumer desire for better quality food produced from natural systems, which supports a strong future for ‘real’ red meat as produced in New Zealand,” Karapeeva said.

Meat Industry Association chief executive, Sirma Karapeeva says she is excited by the research.

Results from the two studies will provide baseline data about pasture-raised beef and lamb and its consumption in comparison to other foods.

A sustained clinical study will see members of 40 households on a managed flexitarian dietary regime over 10 weeks.

Participants will be monitored over the course of the study and changes in health status, behaviours and attitudes and perceptual well-being recorded.

The research is supported by Meat Industry Association Innovation (MIA Innovation) and jointly funded with Beef + Lamb New Zealand Ltd, the High-Value Nutrition National Science Challenge, and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE).

More like this

Industry reacts to UK FTA

Primary industries stakeholders  are welcoming the new Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United Kingdom announced today.

Visa changes welcomed

There's been a swift and positive response from the red meat and dairy sectors to the Government's belated announcement to free up visa arrangements for up to 9,000 migrant workers in the primary sector.

China demands, NZ delivers

Meat Industry Association chair John Loughlin says China is one of the most demanding export markets in the world.

National

Tatua smashes $10 barrier

Waikato milk processor Tatua says keeping products moving to overseas customers during the pandemic was one of the highlights of…

New regs boost Massey Ag course enrolments

Demand for expertise in sustainable nutrient management, environmental planning and improved freshwater outcomes has seen Massey University's range of agricultural…

Machinery & Products

Keeping everyone safe

As tractors get larger and front linkage kits become more common, many have started fitting underrun or collision protection systems.

Keeping stock and drivers safe

Livestock haulers are a crucial link in the New Zealand agriculture supply chain, transporting stock onto or between farms, to…

Making lamb marking easy

Designed by a sheep and beef farmer, Vetmarkers are made in New Zealand and sold around the world.

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Flag it!

OPINION: Agriculture and Trade Minister Damien O'Connor tried to keep his latest overseas jaunt secret squirrel.

Oh dear!

OPINION: This old mutt suggests that farmers' growing discontent with Beef+Lamb NZ's performance is going to reach fever peak after…

» Connect with Rural News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter