Wednesday, 20 January 2016 11:41

Save the planet, eat meat

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The Hound had a bit of a giggle when he saw a recent US study that reveals a diet heavy in some fruit and vegetables does the planet more harm than eating meat.

The study, published in the Environment Systems and Decisions journal, flies in the face of recent calls for humans to reduce meat consumption in a bid to help stem climate change. So just when we are told by tree huggers that eating truckloads of vegetables is the best way to help the environment, researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have found lettuce was "over three times worse in greenhouse gas emissions than eating bacon". The research group studied the impact per calorie of different foods against energy costs, water usage and emissions.

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