Friday, 10 June 2022 12:55

Driving better farm performance

Written by  Mark Daniel
John Deere claims its 6R tractor series will deliver more power, precision agriculture technology and manoeuvrability to NZ farmers. John Deere claims its 6R tractor series will deliver more power, precision agriculture technology and manoeuvrability to NZ farmers.

The John Deere 6R will deliver more power, precision agriculture technology and manoeuverability to New Zealand farmers, according to the company’s Australia/New Zealand production system manager, Steph Gersekowski.

She says the complete 6R stable is fitted with John Deere’s data collection network, JDLink, that is available to farmers with no ongoing costs and will help to power a new wave of precision across the industry.

“With JDLink now readily available, more businesses will have access to data and insights to drive productivity and efficiency improvements,” Gersekowski explains. “While users can also monitor a machine’s location is and gain insights to its performance from any location.”

A further benefit is the suite of online tools delivered through Connected Support to allow remote diagnostics and back up support from local dealerships.

In November last year, four new models were added to the 6R series, including the 6R 140, 6R 150, 6R 165 and 6R 185. The lineup features increased power capacity on the smaller frame models, while the Hydraulic IPM feature provides an extra 20 to 40 horsepower for hydraulic applications.

All 6R tractors can be enhanced with the addition of an optional loader technology package specifically developed to do more work in less time. The package includes a reconfigurable loader joystick with an integrated F/R shuttle, to set preferences and easily manage the direction of the tractor at the touch of a button.

“When equipped with the optional large hydraulic pump, cycle times are improved compared to previous models and help time-poor operators,” Gersekowski adds.

The loader package also includes a dynamic weighing system (DWS), level to horizon (LTH) and return to position (RTP) features. DWS can weigh loads on the go, so removes the need to stop the tractor, as required with static weighing systems, while also removing the need for weigh systems on feeder wagons.

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