Thursday, 22 November 2018 10:55

Organic standards already here

Written by  Pam Tipa
The red meat sector has been urged not to reinvent the wheel in regards to coming up with organic standards for the industry. The red meat sector has been urged not to reinvent the wheel in regards to coming up with organic standards for the industry.

Primary sectors need not create new standards for animal welfare, grass-fed, GMO and biodiversity because these are already part of existing organic standards, says Brendan Hoare.

The former chief executive of Organics Aotearoa NZ (OANZ) says a real task, and one that should be done for the best of New Zealand, is to ‘unpack’ the organic standards which have all these components and are internationally recognised.

“New Zealand does not need is a proliferation of standards and confusion in field (farmer) and market (customer). Clearly pathways to best management practices that are aligned with market requirement are essential.”

Hoare moved on from his position as OANZ chief executive at the end of October, after a restructuring of that organisation, but he remains involved in the industry through his company Pure New Zealand.

He says while there are export markets for organic beef, lamb and wool, there is also a very strong domestic market.

“We always say we are not going to solve the red meat sectors’ issues. But we offer solutions for sure and can answer some of the questions they have, but the structural issues they need to organise.”

In its latest market report, Hoare says OANZ made sure they had the Federation of Maori Authorities, DairyNZ, BLNZ and Horticulture NZ and Wine NZ all doing research with them to find out more. 

 For sheep and beef, results were indicative – although not conclusive – of a trend. At least 50% of BLNZ members, who replied to the research BLNZ put out, wanted to know more about organics. “Farmers want change too.  I come from a farming background, I live on a small farm and I am engaged daily,” says Hoare.

“The market wants change and farmers do too. Most farming communities I talk to realise things aren’t great. No one consciously, purposely likes to pollute or destroy the environment. There might be a few, but we have got to offer pathways for people to move. I think that is crucial. 

“You can’t [sit] on your high horse and blame; that is not the culture you need. You must have an environment where people have avenues to move at a pace, time and framework which works for them and their families. It has to be sustainable economically over time.”

 

More like this

$2b pay off in fine wool shift – NZM

Shifting half of New Zealand’s crossbred wool clip to higher value fine wool contracts could boost the economy by about $2 billion, says NZ Merino Company (NZM) chief executive John Brakenridge.

World’s largest organic winery attending conference

With a total of 922 hectares of biodynamic vineyards, Chile’s Emiliana Vineyards is the largest organic wine producer in the world. Now this renowned winery, one of the world’s Top 50 Admired Wine Brands, will be sharing their knowledge at the upcoming Organic and Biodynamic Wine Conference.

Sheep, goat dairy farmers must aim to export

Waikato Milking Systems product and project manager Andy Geissmann believes there’s plenty of scope for Kiwis working in the emerging sheep and goat dairy sectors to export.

 
 

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Death by trees

OPINION: Your canine crusader finds it ironic that the pompously self-proclaimed ‘champion’ of the provinces and ‘first citizen’ of regional…

All sizzle

OPINION: Remember when Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor, about a year ago, launched his new baby the Primary Sector Council (PSC)…

» Connect with Rural News