Tuesday, 03 September 2019 06:49

Seaweed solution?

Written by  Milking It

Could a pink seaweed hold the solution to our methane emissions problem? Australian scientists think so.

A puffy pink seaweed that can stop cows from burping out methane is being primed for mass farming by researchers at the University of the Sunshine Coast.

The scientists believe that if enough of the seaweed were to be grown for every cow in Australia, the country could cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 10%.

The particular seaweed species, called Asparagopsis, grows prolifically off the Queensland coast. It was the only seaweed found to have the effect in a study five years ago led by CSIRO. Cows are known to eat seaweed. 

The researchers are working at the Bribie Island Research Centre, Moreton Bay, to learn more about how to grow the seaweed. They aim to inform a scale-up of production to supplement cow feed on a national or even a global scale.

Featured

Get ready for the ‘now’ norm

Get prepared for a ‘Now Normal’ future, says Ian Proudfoot – Global Head of Agribusiness for KPMG – discussing the likely effects of COVID-19 in the months to come.

 

Northland farmers count the costs

Northland farmers are starting to count the cost of one of the most severe droughts to hit the region as the cost of feed and lower prices for stock are the order of the day.

Times will get better for deer sector

While the deer industry faces several challenges in the short term, there will be a strong rebound in New Zealand venison sales once global demand recovers.

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

Milking It

Effluent power

Finnish dairy company Valio is on a mission to reduce milk’s carbon footprint to zero by 2035.

What’s in a name?

The man who coined the term ‘Gypsy Day’ is slightly miffed that a term he introduced to New Zealand’s farming…

» Connect with Dairy News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter