Friday, 08 May 2015 09:17

Record verified

Written by 

They say good things take time, and that is certainly the case for South Canterbury arable farmers Warren and Joy Darling who were aiming to better the world record for a barley crop – which was 12.2t/ha – at harvest time this year.

Back in January the Darlings harvested their barley crop (as then reported in Rural News) and recorded 13.8t/ha. Despite this measurement being checked, verified and okayed in NZ by a plethora of officials, this was not good enough for the folk at the Guinness Book of Records. However, some three months later, the good folk at Guinness have at last accepted the achievement as a record and verified it at the 13.8t. The Hound extends his congratulations to the new world record holders for a barley crop. As Captain Blackadder would say, “Well done, Darling.”

 

More like this

Save the planet, eat meat

The Hound had a bit of a giggle when he saw a recent US study that reveals a diet heavy in some fruit and vegetables does the planet more harm than eating meat.

Sensitive

This old mutt's colleagues at Rural News recently received a curt and nasty email from one Briar Smith about the less-than-complimentary review this publication gave Mike Joy's latest book about water quality.

Holier than thou

The sanctimonious lot from Bitch & Complain (Fish & Game) have spat the dummy and walked away from the Land and Water Forum – like a petulant, spoiled child in a blaze of self-interested publicity.

Another puddle

Speaking of Fonterra, the Hound received a curt note from a failed board candidate in last year's election...

MBIE sheepish

The Hound reckons the bureaucrats of MBIE, who among other things have responsibility for employment -- but also the unemployed, or is it unemployable? -- are themselves so unemployable that...

 
 

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Yuck

This old mutt notes that millionaire Hollywood producer and advocate for mung bean farming James Cameron is happy to fly…

Showing the way

A mate of the Hound reckons some major agricultural companies wanting to promote their ideas and services could learn from…

» Connect with Rural News