Wednesday, 30 March 2022 14:55

New investigation into native honey

Written by  Staff Reporters
The High-Value Nutrition Science Challenge are funding an investigation into native honey composition. The High-Value Nutrition Science Challenge are funding an investigation into native honey composition.

Plant & Food Research will be leading a national team of research looking at native honey composition and the characteristics that appeal most to consumers.

The funding for the project comes from the High-Value Nutrition National Science Challenge.

The two-year project focuses on prominent native monofloral (single flower nectar) honey – predominantly from kanuka, rata, rewarewa and kamahi – produced by Te Pumautanga o Te Arawa (TPT) beekeeping activities on Department of Conservation areas in the Rotorua region.

The project will analyse examples of honey from across the different geographical regions of the TPT rohe (territory/boundary) to search for specific chemical signatures and potential unique biomarkets.

It will determine the consistency and flavours of honey that consumers prefer, as well as consumer perceptions of Māori values and provenance.

“Honey and honey-related products account for more than $400 million of New Zealand’s export earnings each year,” says project co-lead Aaron McCallion from Waka Digital. “Mānuka honey is the primary honey export, valued for its unique bioactive properties. However, we believe that other native species may also produce honey with great taste and bioactives that will also appeal to consumers.

“Mānuka honey has scientifically-validated properties that consumers will pay a premium for,” says Dr John van Klink, project co-lead from Plant & Food Research.

Combined with advanced consumer insights, the new knowledge gleaned from the project will provide further awareness of the unique properties and consumer value of lesser-kknown honeys, and support the development of new monofloral honeys.

“This investment of over $980,000 from the High-Value Nutrition National Science Challenge fits well with our objective of supporting industrie with their growth aspirations through the application of science,” says Joanne Todd, challenge director.

 The project brings together a multidisciplinary team of experts and scientists from Te Arawa and other iwi/hapu entities, Plant & Food Research, AgResearch, Massey University and Apiculture NZ to employ a collaborative bicultural approach.

More like this

Hort sector jumps on regen train

Two of New Zealand’s largest horticultural businesses – T&G Global and Zespri – are teaming up with science organisation Plant & Food Research on a new project investigating regenerative horticulture.

Big wet takes sting out of bees

The heavy rains in the lower North Island and parts of Northland in December has kept bees in these areas in their hives - unwilling it seems to venture out in the poor weather.

National

AWDT chair steps down

Agri-Women’s Development Trust (AWDT) chair Linda Cooper has stepped down after three years serving the charitable trust.

Machinery & Products

Making life easier

Many temporary sheep fencing systems can be troublesome, with reels jamming or breaking and the bugbear of silly hooks on…

Valtra's following grows

With the release of its N5 and T5 series of tractors, Valtra continues to expand its presence in the Australia-New…

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

No free ride!

OPINION: This old mutt is getting somewhat tired of multi-national, tax-dodging, fund-raising group Greenpeace always given front and centre mainstream…

How come?

OPINION: A mate of yours truly is questioning exactly why the Māori ag sector have been given special budget funding by…

» Connect with Rural News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter