Friday, 08 November 2019 11:35

Like father, like son

Written by  Staff Reporters
Charlie and his brother Louie Herbert in the ring in 2017, when they won a second place ribbon for the all breeds pair. Charlie and his brother Louie Herbert in the ring in 2017, when they won a second place ribbon for the all breeds pair.

Competing in the livestock contests at the New Zealand Agricultural Show is not for the faint-hearted.

Over 3000 animals and exhibitors are on site, all vying for a prestigious ribbon and recognition amongst their peers. 

Very determined competitors can be found amongst the younger entrants. 

They give up weekends on the pitch or nights watching television to put in the months of preparation needed for a chance at winning a medal. 

No one knows all this better than Charlie Herbert (14), son of this year’s president of the show, Chris Herbert. Charlie has attended the show since he was born and has competed in its cattle section since he was just five. 

Charlie explains what he loves about being a part of the show community.

Q. When do you start preparing to ensure you and your animals are show ready?

A. Teaching the cattle to lead is the hardest part, so we start that in April! Every school holidays after that is spent working with them. We also have to keep an eye on dad and make sure he has our cattle in a good paddock so they are well fed and looking their best.

Q. What do you look forward to most about coming to the show each year?

A. Meeting loads of new people and spending time with others who share the same interests as me. The other breeders are always willing to help me out and provide advice. It’s the best place to learn from others and get better.  The breakfast in the members’ marquee is also a highlight.

Q. What’s the biggest challenge about competing at the show?

A. Competition is so high every year and I am always competing against people with a lot more experience than me. But this is the best way to improve, learn from others and come back better every year. It makes me determined.

Q. What parts of the show are your family involved in?

A. My whole family is involved in supporting the cattle section and we get together with other committee members at working bees before the show. Mum helps get all the ribbons ready too. Dad is president of the show this year which is pretty cool. But mum and dad help us with exhibiting every year. 

Q. If you were going to have a go at anything else at the show what would it be?

A. I’d like to be a steward to help the show keep going. 

Show dates

The New Zealand Agricultural Show is a three-day annual event, running Wednesday to Friday in November. 

Canterbury Anniversary Day falls on the Friday of the show and is called ‘Show Day’. (Canterbury Anniversary Day falls each year on the second Friday after the first Tuesday in November.)

This year the New Zealand Agricultural Show runs from Wednesday 13 to Friday 15 November.

More info: https://www.theshow.co.nz

More like this

Judge named for on-farm comp

Waikato contract milker Corey Ferguson has been named as the judge for the New Zealand Agricultural Show’s on-farm competition in November.

Plastic sheep rake in money

The plastic sheep that became famous around Christchurch city after the earthquakes have slowly started going to new homes. 

The show will go on!

The country’s biggest annual A&P show will go ahead with cattle classes this year despite the threat of spreading Mycoplasma bovis.

Featured

Water reforms come at a cost

The government’s new freshwater laws, signed off this week, have the potential to create significant unnecessary costs for ratepayers, farmers and entire communities, Federated Farmers says.

2020 harvest yields up

Final harvest data for wheat, barley and oats (milling/malting and feed) in 2020 show yields were up 17% overall across the six crops.

 

Difficult but the right call

DairyNZ chief executive Dr Tim Mackle says the joint decision three years ago to eradicate Mycoplamsa bovis was a difficult call.

Milking cluster milks runner-up award

DeLaval has come away with the runner up prize in this year’s Fieldays Online innovation competition with a new milking cluster that eliminates the need for conventional liner changes.

Glow worms to cows

Thomas Lundman's work focus has gone from tracking tiny critters in pitch black caves to looking after considerably larger animals in paddocks near Whakatane.

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Spell check

Your old mutt was not surprised to see the NZ Dairy Industry Awards hastily remove the title of this year’s…

About time!

Your canine crusader has been a long-time critic of NZ governments – of all stripes – who, for the past…

» Connect with Rural News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter