Monday, 11 March 2019 14:19

130,000 bees go under the microscope

Written by 

Sampling has been completed for the largest and most detailed study of honey bee health ever undertaken in New Zealand.

More than 60 beekeepers have participated in Biosecurity New Zealand’s Bee Pathogen Programme and had their hives tested every six months for two and half years.

Biosecurity New Zealand senior scientist, Dr Richard Hall, says the research will provide a wealth of valuable information to the beekeeping industry.

“The Bee Pathogen Programme will help us better understand the effect that diseases, climate and apiary management practices have on colony losses and productivity,” he says.  

“We have completed sampling and our experts have begun carefully evaluating the huge amount of data that has been collected.

“This includes studying more than 130,000 honey bees from 300 samples taken throughout the country that are now archived in Biosecurity New Zealand’s freezers.

Once the data has been carefully evaluated it will be available to the beekeeping industry and to researchers for further analysis.”

Biosecurity New Zealand is aiming to release its conclusions from the Bee Pathogen Programme in late 2019.

More like this

Think again

Have you given up milk in the name of sustainability? Think again.

Featured

$26m boost to rural health

The government has announced a $300 million dollar capital investment in health, with $26 million going to regional and rural service projects.

New levy to hit farmers

The New Zealand Agricultural Aviation Association (NZAAA) is up in arms about a proposed new safety levy.

 

Winegrower wins a Nuffield

For the first time in 45 years, a member of New Zealand’s wine industry has won a Nuffield Scholarship.

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Says it all!

A mate of yours truly reckons one only needs to look at the gongs given out in the New Year…

Easily bought

This old mutt was not surprised to see a number of supposed ag industry ‘thought leaders’ (a pompous title if…

» Connect with Rural News