Thursday, 02 July 2015 11:05

New phase for NAIT programme

Written by 
All cattle must be tagged and registered in the NAIT system. All cattle must be tagged and registered in the NAIT system.

July is the start of the next phase for OSPRI’s NAIT programme with the three-year exemption period for pre-NAIT cattle now over.

This means that all cattle must be tagged and registered in the NAIT system, even if they are not leaving the property or were born before the NAIT programme launched in July 2012 (the transition period for deer ends on 1 March 2016).

Dr Stu Hutchings, OSPRI group manager, says, “Our goal is to get everybody on board with NAIT so we can all reap the benefits of tighter TB control and continued access to export markets. The only way to make this happen is if farmers play their part and fulfil their NAIT obligations.”

A key focus over the coming months will be working with farmers to help them understand and meet their obligations. The information collected by NAIT allows OSPRI to hold and report on movement and location data to support food safety and biosecurity systems within New Zealand.

 “We’ve got a team out in the field dedicated to helping farmers meet their obligations. We need every cattle and deer farmer to provide the information about their stock or they jeopardise the effort put in by their fellow farmers throughout the country who see the importance of this for primary industry,” says Hutchings.

OSPRI is working on ways to make it easier to meet NAIT obligations and recently launched a new way for farmers to update their NAIT account called ‘stocktake’. Using a scanner, farmers can scan all their animals (or a group of them) and upload one up to date file to the NAIT system.

There will be no change to the process for animals that are impractical to tag (ITT) say OSPRI. Farmers can continue sending these animals to a meat processor, and pay a $13 ITT levy. The current legislation around ITT animals is going to be reviewed and the process for them is likely to change in the future.

More like this

Animal tracing improves

The latest NAIT data shows farmers are increasing their engagement with the system and becoming more compliant.

Animal tracing improves

The latest NAIT data shows farmers are increasing their engagement with the system and becoming more compliant.

Featured

Water reforms come at a cost

The government’s new freshwater laws, signed off this week, have the potential to create significant unnecessary costs for ratepayers, farmers and entire communities, Federated Farmers says.

2020 harvest yields up

Final harvest data for wheat, barley and oats (milling/malting and feed) in 2020 show yields were up 17% overall across the six crops.

 

Difficult but the right call

DairyNZ chief executive Dr Tim Mackle says the joint decision three years ago to eradicate Mycoplamsa bovis was a difficult call.

Milking cluster milks runner-up award

DeLaval has come away with the runner up prize in this year’s Fieldays Online innovation competition with a new milking cluster that eliminates the need for conventional liner changes.

Glow worms to cows

Thomas Lundman's work focus has gone from tracking tiny critters in pitch black caves to looking after considerably larger animals in paddocks near Whakatane.

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Spell check

Your old mutt was not surprised to see the NZ Dairy Industry Awards hastily remove the title of this year’s…

About time!

Your canine crusader has been a long-time critic of NZ governments – of all stripes – who, for the past…

» Connect with Rural News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter