Monday, 21 November 2016 14:53

Fruit fly stopped at border

Written by 
The Queensland fruit fly. The Queensland fruit fly.

Ministry for Primary Industries staff have intercepted four Queensland fruit fly larvae at Wellington airport, stopping the dangerous pest from making a home in New Zealand.

The larvae were found earlier this month in an undeclared mandarin carried by an Australian passenger arriving from Melbourne. They have since been confirmed as Queensland fruit fly – regarded as one of the worst horticultural pests in the world.

"One of our quarantine officers detected the fruit when the passenger's bag went through an MPI biosecurity x-ray machine. Another officer discovered insect damage on the mandarin and pulled the skin off, finding the larvae nestled inside," says Andrew Spelman, MPI border clearance manager, Central and South Region.

"Keeping fruit fly out of New Zealand is one of our highest priorities. The Wellington interception shows the value of MPI’s biosecurity x-ray technology, which has been upgraded over the past few years."

So far this year, MPI staff have made 11 fruit fly interceptions at the border.

MPI checks all produce seized from arriving passengers for signs of pests or diseases, says Spelman. It also checks organic material disposed in MPI amnesty bins at airports and ports.

The Australian traveller received a $400 fine for failing to declare the mandarin.

» Connect with Rural News

More like this

Hort export figures challenged

Horticulture's export revenue growth is likely to be about 10% in the current financial year – not the 3.8% forecast by the Ministry for Primary Industries.

» The RNG Weather Report

Featured

Soil moisture: no more looking over the fence

Farm manager Bryan Mitchell describes as brilliant the SCADAfarm systems that allow him to remotely monitor and manage the irrigation of his 300ha of leased grazing land near Kirwee.

 

Separation gives constant result

Effluent separation offers a number of unique advantages, and opportunities that other systems don’t offer, says farm equipment manufacturer Rakaia Engineering Ltd (REL) Group.

Making good use of green water

Reporoa farmer Alistair Neville is using the Tow and Fert range for more environmentally-friendly farming practices. 

Cultivating the right way

Cultivation of paddocks is common on farms at this time of year. It’s also a time when local storms may occur, adding substantial risk to an important farming practice.

» Connect with Rural News

» Connect with Rural News

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Job hunting?

A mate of the Hound reckons outgoing special agricultural trade envoy Mike Petersen, who is due to finish his current…

Hot air?

With the Government wanting to implement huge costs on the livestock farming sector by making New Zealand the only country…

» Connect with Rural News