Save our soils — Editorial

There’s been something of a makeover in New Zealand vineyards in recent years, as the clean-cut look of sprayed rows and boundaries loses a little gloss.

New Zealand’s wine industry is adapting to survive and thrive. Inset: Sophie Preece.

At Boneline in Waipara, Paul Goodege ferments grapes grown on the fossils of dinosaurs, the bones of moa, and a landscape carved by a glacier.

 
 
Clive Jones.

Busy, busy, busy. The countdown is on for the first vintage of the new decade and the one thing we can guarantee is it will be the best of the decade - so far, of course.

New Zealand Winegrowers Chair John Clarke.

The past year has been a momentous one for our sector. For me the past 12 months has been marked by two stand out events.

At the recent 200 year celebrations in the Bay of Islands, NZ Winegrowers was very pleased to announce a new development to support and encourage young leaders in the industry.

In his diary Reverend Samuel Marsden records on September 25 1819 that he planted some grapevines in the grounds of the Stone Store, Kerikeri in the Bay of Islands. These vines were the first planted in New Zealand.

When you stop learning, you stop growing. It’s a saying that came to mind a few times recently, after attending two learning experiences offered to members of the New Zealand wine industry.

Each day news services are filled with latest research and commentary around the manifestations of climate change, whether it is, for example, record temperatures in the Arctic or the loss of ice from glaciers around the globe.

The halcyon days of summer are now long behind us, as the country prepares for winter. The harvest is a distant memory; of 24-hour days, the chatter of a multitude of languages and fruit of outstanding quality coming through the winery doors.

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Editorial

Save our soils — Editorial

Save our soils — Editorial

There’s been something of a makeover in New Zealand vineyards in recent years, as the clean-cut look of sprayed rows…

Evolve & survive

Evolve & survive

At Boneline in Waipara, Paul Goodege ferments grapes grown on the fossils of dinosaurs, the bones of moa, and a…

 

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