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Thursday, 26 November 2015 14:57

Mixed wool market

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The North Island auction received mixed support with the stronger NZ dollar having a limited impact in some areas. The North Island auction received mixed support with the stronger NZ dollar having a limited impact in some areas.

New Zealand Wool Services International's chief executive John Dawson says the North Island auction received mixed support with the stronger NZ dollar having a limited impact in some areas.

Of the 6,500 bales on offer 97.5% sold.

The weighted indicator for the main trading currencies was up 1.35% compared to the last sale on 19th November, accounting for a corresponding local market reduction in some sectors.

Dawson advises that the finer end of the Fine Crossbred Fleece were up to 1.5% dearer with the stronger end buyer's favour.

Fine Crossbred Shears 3 to 5 and 3 to 4 inches were firm to 2.5% cheaper with the shorter lengths firm to 2% dearer.

Coarse Crossbred Full Fleece were 1.5% cheaper with Coarse Shears firm to 2% dearer.

Long Oddments remained firm with shorter oddments 3 to 7% cheaper.

Lambs Fleece were nominally unchanged.

Well spread competition with China and Australasia principals supported by Western Europe, Middle East, India and the United Kingdom.

Next sale on 3 December will comprise of approximately 5,000 bales from the South Island with the North Island sale cancelled due to weather affecting shearing.

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