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Wednesday, 15 January 2020 13:12

Appropriate

Written by  The Hound

Your canine crusader reckons it is ironic – and highly appropriate – that Shane Jones’ $3 billion electoral slush fund the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) has exactly the same initials as the Problem Gambling Foundation (PGF)!

The Hound suggests Jones is just like a gambling addict, but his $3-billion tab is funded by hard-working NZ taxpayers.

While the mouth of the north is spraying around his bets on things like rat traps and bloody awful pine trees – in a desperate attempt to get re-elected – payback from the PGF looks paltry.

Official figures show around $300 million of the fund has so far been spent with only 616 fulltime jobs created; meaning every one of these fulltime jobs cost $484,000 each!

So perhaps Jones should go see the PGF about him gambling away the PGF kitty!

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