Print this page
Wednesday, 04 July 2018 09:55

Potential risk to NZ’s primary exports

Written by 
Mike Petersen. Mike Petersen.

Mike Petersen says the potential US-China trade war poses long term threats for NZ products.

If there is a tariff on a product from the US into China, you’d have to question where that product will go, he says. It could displace NZ product in other parts of the world or it could find its way to NZ.

“The whole displacement effect could have a big effect on NZ as a country that relies very much on exporting and access to markets,” Petersen says.

“While it is not an issue directly impacting NZ, the spillover effects could be significant. They are the ones we have got to watch very closely.”

Petersen says several people suggest NZ may be advantaged by a US-China trade war.

“There may be a short term opportunity for some products into these markets as a result of the tariffs but the long term risk of it impacting on NZ products is far greater,” he says.

In some ways NZ needs to keep its head down; it does not need to join sides on any of this, Petersen says. 

“We need to keep our head down – keep calm and carry on. But equally we need to make sure our voice is heard and that people understand the risks of the trade war that is looking increasingly likely.”

» Connect with Rural News

More like this

Four more years, mate

The NZ/China Free Trade Agreement (FTA) upgrade has brought little joy to the dairy industry.

Job hunting?

A mate of the Hound reckons outgoing special agricultural trade envoy Mike Petersen, who is due to finish his current role at the end of the year, is currying favour – and job prospects – with the Government by backing its moves to lump agriculture into the ETS.

US exports soar

US dairy exporters keep finding new markets for cheese and dairy ingredients despite facing trade tensions.

» The RNG Weather Report

Featured

 

Proper training beats learning on the hoof

New Zealand's first professional dairy cow hoof trimmer has fulfilled a long-held dream, setting up a training institute to bring internationally recognised standards of hoofcare to the industry.

FE researchers aim to raise awareness

Facial eczema in dairy cattle can cause significant production losses without visible symptoms, says a new group formed to raise awareness of the disease.

» Connect with Rural News

» Connect with Rural News