fbpx
Print this page
Sunday, 30 June 2019 18:54

Hoof blocks keep away lameness

Written by 

Moving promptly against lameness in cows deals to their pain and can reduce long term hoof damage, says Shoof International, which markets Walkease hoof blocks.

Early intervention reduces the duration and severity of lameness although its not always possible to eliminate it, Shoof says.

The blocks are for use when lameness is detected early. They are a new style claw prosthetic made from ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA), a product more commonly used in the supports of running shoe soles. 

Used with a fast drying cyanoacrylate adhesive, Walkease offers a fast and effective way to address lameness early.

It works by elevating the affected claw, allowing the animal to transfer weight to the healthy claw. This speeds recovery via increased mobility and function (a reduction in locomotion score).

Blocks compress down naturally over 10-14 days of wear so the healthy claw suffers no ill effects. 

The blocks are claimed inexpensive, easy to fit and make for quicker recovery.

www.walkease.co.nz 

More like this

Practical tools to prevent lameness

Lameness is estimated to cost Australian farmers at least A$250 for each cow that develops the problem and can greatly reduce cow comfort and longevity.

Kicking out lameness

Cow lameness is a painful condition. As farm systems change, farm sizes grow and herd numbers expand, lameness is an increasing concern on New Zealand farms.

Featured

$700m for freshwater clean up

The Government has announced a $700 million fund to support the primary sector and other groups in meeting new clean water standards.

Synlait's milk price drop

Canterbury milk processor Synlait has reduced its 2019-20 forecast base milk price by 20c to $7.05/kgMS.

 

Overstayers irk farmers

A new law preventing the eviction of tenants from rental properties is causing a headache for some dairy farmers.

Katie’s parting shot

Outgoing Federated Farmers president Katie Milne has hit out at Wellington-based government officials for their lack of understanding about farming.

Feed shortage looming large

Parts of the Waikato are starting to recover from the drought, but the availability of feed remains a concern, says DairyNZ’s Sharon Morrell.

Southland on the brink

Southland is teetering on the edge of a bad situation, according to DairyNZ’s lead consulting officer in the South Island, Tony Finch.