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Monday, 04 July 2016 07:55

Heat detection hits the spot

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The Flashmate electronic heat detector. The Flashmate electronic heat detector.

Animal management and fencing supplier Gallagher took out a gong at Fieldays 2016.

The company won the International Innovation Award for its Flashmate electronic heat detector.

This tool for lifting a herd's mating performance places a flashing red light on cows' flanks to tell farm staff that a cow is on heat; and it helps improve submission rates by detecting animals that might otherwise have been missed. Read more about it here.

Mark Harris, global marketing manager at Gallagher, says the award is a nice fit with this year's Fieldays theme of collaboration.

"We're extremely proud to receive this award which was developed in a partnership with technology company Farmshed Labs. After testing and refinement in the lab and on farms nationwide, the product is now launched across Australasia. The award recognises our and our partner's efforts in bringing the product to the market."

www.gallagher.co.nz 

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